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The Fine Arts Association Theatre Auditions Information

For Adult Productions Auditions: Auditions notices for adult productions are sent out prior to each audition. If you would like to be added to our audition mailing list, contact Ann Hedger, Programming Coordinator, at 440-951-7500, ext. 103

For Youth Theatre Productions: Audition notices for youth theatre productions are NOT mailed out but WILL appear in the newspapers listed to the right. Audition information flyers may also be picked up at The Fine Arts Association.

Audition Information for:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream
By William Shakespeare

Directed by Sandy Kosovich Peck

Presented by the Yarnell Youth Theatre Company

Audition Dates – Monday, December 8 & Tuesday, December 9, 2014 – beginning at 6:30 pm in the Corning Auditorium

Rehearsals beginPossible read through week of December 15, 2014. Rehearsals begin week of January 5, 2015. Rehearsals will be Sunday thru Thursdays.

Production Dates – February 20-March 1, 2015. Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30 pm and Sundays at 2:00 pm.  Two daytime performances on February 24 & 26 at 11:00 am.

Audition Requirements:
- Appointments required.

- Call Ann Hedger at 440-951-7500 x103 to make your appointment.
- Come prepared with one of the Midsummer monologues that are posted below. Select and print out one of the monologues appropriate for your age group. Monologues do not need to be memorized, though you must be prepared to perform it for the audition.

Casting Inform
- Needed:   Cast of approximately 20-30. All roles are available.
- Age range is 9-19 years old. Auditioners must be at least 9 years old by audition dates

Roles available:
Hermia (female), daughter of Egeus, in love with Lysander
Lysander (male), in love with Hermia
Helena (female), in love with Demetrius
Demetrius (male), in love with Hermia
Theseus, (male) Duke of Athens
Hippolyta (female), queen of the Amazons
Egeus (male), father of Hermia
Philostrate (male), master of the revels to Theseus
Nick Bottom (male), a weaver
Peter Quince (male), a carpenter
Francis Flute (male), a bellows-mender
Tom Snout (male), a tinker
Snug (male), a joiner
Robin Starveling (male), a tailor
Oberon (male) king of the fairies
Titania (female), queen of the fairies
Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow (male), a fairy in service to Oberon
Fairy (female), in service to Titania
Peaseblossom (male or female), a fairy attending upon Titania
Cobweb (male or female), a fairy attending upon Titania
Moth (male or female), a fairy attending upon Titania
Mustardseed (male or female), a fairy attending upon Titania
Lords, Ladies, and Attendants on Theseus and Hippolyta
Other fairies in the trains of Titania and Oberon

About the show:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream is William Shakespeare's most popular comedy. It portrays the adventures of four young lovers and a group of amateur actors, their interactions with woodland fairies and a duke and duchess. Taking place in a mythical Athens and an enchanted forest, there is a handsome fairy king, a misguided parent, star-crossed lovers, a weaver who's transformed into a half-donkey, wood sprites and elves. This work is widely performed around the world, and no wonder - it's about the world's most popular pastime, falling in love. But as Puck knows, falling in love can make fools of us all.

A Midsummer Night's Dream audition monologues

For male or female ages 9-12, choose EITHER Fairy or Puck (both from Act 2, scene 1)

FAIRY:
Either I mistake your shape and making quite,
Or else you are that shrewd and knavish sprite
Call'd Robin Goodfellow: are not you he
That frights the maidens of the villagery;
Skim milk, and sometimes labour in the quern
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn;
And sometime make the drink to bear no barm;
Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?
Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
You do their work, and they shall have good luck:
Are not you he?

PUCK:
Thou speak'st aright;
I am that merry wanderer of the night.
I jest to Oberon and make him smile
When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile,
Neighing in likeness of a filly foal:
And sometime lurk I in a gossip's bowl,
In very likeness of a roasted crab,
And when she drinks, against her lips I bob
And on her wither'd dewlap pour the ale.
The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale,
Sometime for three-foot stool mistaketh me;
Then slip I from her bum, down topples she,
And 'tailor' cries, and falls into a cough;
And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh,
And waxen in their mirth and neeze and swear
A merrier hour was never wasted there.
But, room, fairy! here comes Oberon.

 

For males ages 13-19, choose EITHER Bottom (Act 4, scene 1), Oberon (Act 2, scene 1), or Lysander (Act 1, scene 1)

OBERON:
I know a bank where the wild thyme blows,
Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows,
Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine,
With sweet musk-roses and with eglantine:
There sleeps Titania sometime of the night,
Lull'd in these flowers with dances and delight;
And there the snake throws her enamell'd skin,
Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in:
And with the juice of this I'll streak her eyes,
And make her full of hateful fantasies.
Take thou some of it, and seek through this grove:
A sweet Athenian lady is in love
With a disdainful youth: anoint his eyes;
But do it when the next thing he espies
May be the lady: thou shalt know the man
By the Athenian garments he hath on.
Effect it with some care, that he may prove
More fond on her than she upon her love:
And look thou meet me ere the first cock crow.

LYSANDER:
A good persuasion: therefore, hear me, Hermia.
I have a widow aunt, a dowager
Of great revenue, and she hath no child:
From Athens is her house remote seven leagues;
And she respects me as her only son.
There, gentle Hermia, may I marry thee;
And to that place the sharp Athenian law
Cannot pursue us. If thou lovest me then,
Steal forth thy father's house to-morrow night;
And in the wood, a league without the town,
Where I did meet thee once with Helena,
To do observance to a morn of May,
There will I stay for thee.

BOTTOM:
[Awaking] When my cue comes, call me, and I will
answer: my next is, 'Most fair Pyramus.' Heigh-ho!
Peter Quince! Flute, the bellows-mender! Snout,
the tinker! Starveling! God's my life, stolen
hence, and left me asleep! I have had a most rare
vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to
say what dream it was: man is but an ass, if he go
about to expound this dream. Methought I was--there
is no man can tell what. Methought I was,--and
methought I had,--but man is but a patched fool, if
he will offer to say what methought I had. The eye
of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not
seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue
to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream
was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of
this dream: it shall be called Bottom's Dream,
because it hath no bottom; and I will sing it in the
latter end of a play, before the duke:
peradventure, to make it the more gracious, I shall
sing it at her death.

For females ages 13-19, choose EITHER Helena (Act 1, scene 1), Titania (Act 2, scene 1), or Hermia (Act 2, scene 2).

HELENA:
How happy some o'er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know:
And as he errs, doting on Hermia's eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities:
Things base and vile, folding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind;
And therefore is wing'd Cupid painted blind:
Nor hath Love's mind of any judgement taste;
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste:
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguiled.
As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjured every where:
For ere Demetrius look'd on Hermia's eyne,
He hail'd down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolved, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia's flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense:
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

TITANIA:
Set your heart at rest:
The fairy land buys not the child of me.
His mother was a votaress of my order:
And, in the spiced Indian air, by night,
Full often hath she gossip'd by my side,
And sat with me on Neptune's yellow sands,
Marking the embarked traders on the flood,
When we have laugh'd to see the sails conceive
And grow big-bellied with the wanton wind;
Which she, with pretty and with swimming gait
Following,--her womb then rich with my young squire,--
Would imitate, and sail upon the land,
To fetch me trifles, and return again,
As from a voyage, rich with merchandise.
But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;
And for her sake do I rear up her boy,
And for her sake I will not part with him.

HERMIA:
[Awaking] Help me, Lysander, help me! do thy best
To pluck this crawling serpent from my breast!
Ay me, for pity! what a dream was here!
Lysander, look how I do quake with fear:
Methought a serpent eat my heart away,
And you sat smiling at his cruel pray.
Lysander! what, removed? Lysander! lord!
What, out of hearing? gone? no sound, no word?
Alack, where are you speak, an if you hear;
Speak, of all loves! I swoon almost with fear.
No? then I well perceive you all not nigh
Either death or you I'll find immediately.

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